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Posts for: July, 2017

By Carolyn Bronke Wind, DDS, PC
July 28, 2017
Category: Oral Health
DrTravisStorkDontIgnoreBleedingGums

Are bleeding gums something you should be concerned about? Dear Doctor magazine recently posed that question to Dr. Travis Stork, an emergency room physician and host of the syndicated TV show The Doctors. He answered with two questions of his own: “If you started bleeding from your eyeball, would you seek medical attention?” Needless to say, most everyone would. “So,” he asked, “why is it that when we bleed all the time when we floss that we think it’s no big deal?” As it turns out, that’s an excellent question — and one that’s often misunderstood.

First of all, let’s clarify what we mean by “bleeding all the time.” As many as 90 percent of people occasionally experience bleeding gums when they clean their teeth — particularly if they don’t do it often, or are just starting a flossing routine. But if your gums bleed regularly when you brush or floss, it almost certainly means there’s a problem. Many think bleeding gums is a sign they are brushing too hard; this is possible, but unlikely. It’s much more probable that irritated and bleeding gums are a sign of periodontal (gum) disease.

How common is this malady? According to the U.S. Centers for Disease Control, nearly half of all  Americans over age 30 have mild, moderate or severe gum disease — and that number increases to 70.1 percent for those over 65! Periodontal disease can occur when a bacteria-rich biofilm in the mouth (also called plaque) is allowed to build up on tooth and gum surfaces. Plaque causes the gums to become inflamed, as the immune system responds to the bacteria. Eventually, this can cause gum tissue to pull away from the teeth, forming bacteria-filled “pockets” under the gum surface. If left untreated, it can lead to more serious infection, and even tooth loss.

What should you do if your gums bleed regularly when brushing or flossing? The first step is to come in for a thorough examination. In combination with a regular oral exam (and possibly x-rays or other diagnostic tests), a simple (and painless) instrument called a periodontal probe can be used to determine how far any periodontal disease may have progressed. Armed with this information, we can determine the most effective way to fight the battle against gum disease.

Above all, don’t wait too long to come in for an exam! As Dr. Stork notes, bleeding gums are “a sign that things aren’t quite right.”  If you would like more information about bleeding gums, please contact us or schedule an appointment. You can read more in the Dear Doctor magazine article “Bleeding Gums.” You can read the entire interview with Dr. Travis Stork in Dear Doctor magazine.


By Carolyn Bronke Wind, DDS, PC
July 26, 2017
Category: Oral Health
Tags: TMD  

For patients experiencing ongoing pain in the jaw, ear or muscles on the side of the face, TMD may be occurring. It is often accompaniedStiff Jaw by a popping or clicking sound and limited jaw movement. TMD or temporomandibular disorder is a condition that affects the TMJ or the temporomandibular joint (jaw joint). It is characterized by conditions that cause pain and dysfunction to the jaw and muscles surrounding it. TMD can be successfully treated by Dr. Carolyn Bronke and Dr. Josephine Puleo in La Grange, IL.

Treating TMD in La Grange

It isn’t always simple to figure out why these symptoms are occurring. The good news is that most TMD cases can resolve themselves or require conservative remedies to improve symptoms. The two TMJs that connect the lower jaw known as the mandible to the temporal bone on the skull are complex joints that allow movement. The lower jaw and the temporal bone fit together similar to that of a ball and socket. Muscles in the temples and cheeks move the lower jaw itself. Any of these parts can become the source of the TMD problem in a patient. If you are in pain or having trouble opening or closing your jaw, a thorough examination is needed to determine the cause of your TMD.

Some of the most common symptoms of TMD include:

  1. Clicking sounds
  2. Muscle pain
  3. Joint Pain

Treatment methods may include jaw exercises. In more severe TMD cases, complex treatments such as orthodontics or bridgework ​may be recommended. Surgery is very rare in TMD patients. Trying a range of conservative treatments typically have been proven to be effective.

The first step in treating your TMD in La Grange, IL is a thorough dental examination from Dr. Carolyn Bronke and Dr. Josephine Puleo. To learn more about your treatment options and to schedule an appointment, call their office today at 708-354-1335.


By Carolyn Bronke Wind, DDS, PC
July 13, 2017
Category: Oral Health
3DentalSignsofanEatingDisorder

Sometimes dental conditions point to health problems beyond the teeth and gums. An astute dentist may even be able to discern that a person’s oral problems actually arise from issues with their emotional well-being.  In fact, a visit to the dentist could uncover the presence of two of the most prominent eating disorders, bulimia nervosa or anorexia nervosa.

Here are 3 signs dentists look for that may indicate an eating disorder.

Dental Erosion. Ninety percent of patients with bulimia and twenty percent with anorexia have some form of enamel erosion. This occurs because stomach acid — which can soften and erode enamel — enters the mouth during self-induced vomiting (purging), a prominent behavior with bulimics and somewhat with anorexics. This erosion looks different from other causes because the tongue rests against the back of the bottom teeth during vomiting, shielding them from much of the stomach acid. As a result, erosion is usually more severe on the upper front teeth, particularly on the tongue side and biting edges.

Enlarged Salivary Glands. A person induces vomiting during purging by using their fingers or other objects. This irritates soft tissues in the back of the throat like the salivary glands and causes them to swell. A dentist or hygienist may notice redness on the inside of the throat or puffiness on the outside of the face just below the ears.

Over-Aggressive Brushing. Bulimics are acutely aware of their appearance and often practice diligent hygiene habits. This includes brushing the teeth, especially after a purging episode. In doing so they may become too aggressive and, coupled with brushing right after purging when the minerals in enamel are softened, cause even greater erosion.

Uncovering a family member’s eating disorder can be stressful for all involved. In the long run, it’s best to seek out professional help and guidance — a good place to start is the National Eating Disorders Association (www.nationaleatingdisorders.org). While you’re seeking help, you can also minimize dental damage by encouraging the person to rinse with water (or a little baking soda) after purging to neutralize any acid in the mouth, as well as avoid brushing for an hour.

If you would like more information on the effect of eating disorders on oral health, please contact us or schedule an appointment for a consultation. You can also learn more about this topic by reading the Dear Doctor magazine article “Bulimia, Anorexia & Oral Health.”